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20130101
20130131
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CSPAN2 37
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English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 7:15am EST
sawyer, a customs inspector and volunteer fireman in san francisco, whose name twain would immortalize in his novel, the adventures of tom sawyer. the two met in 1863 when the 20 year-old mark twain befriended mr. sawyer over cards and drinks. it was during these casual meetings that sawyer relates -- relayed to twain stories of his youth. >> well, i actually left my cave. in the mornings i get up and at early dawn, and i haven't does provide editors the drawing. i like the drawing best. and that work -- i've had 10 books. all illustrated. i'm just having such a great time doing this stuff. so they asked me when i came your what were my prerequisites for writing the book. it's got to be simply place am going to write it, it takes 15 years, i've had books take that long, i'm going to finish but the other one, there can be another book. they can't be another book under the subject. i like a subject that's never been touched or you have the challenge of going back and digging and digging and bringing this to life. and the rule i have is let's say tom sawyer our mark twain came back today,
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 8:00pm EST
in the book "season of the witch" author subthree presents a modern history of san francisco from 1967 to 1982 and a san the san francisco bookstore he talked about this period in the city's history including the counterculture of the 60s and the onset of the aids epidemic. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much and thank you for braving the san francisco juggernaut to be here tonight. and thank you for the booksmith for having me. i love to hang out at the store. i'm a customer more than i am an author and hopefully i have help keep your business over the years. but it's appropriate actually this weather because it's buried daschle hammond likened the season in which people knew for the hippie or stereotypes about to be, but i really wanted with "season of the witch" to tell the history of the city as daschle hammond might have written it, with the same sense of the city's toughness, of its mystery and of its kind of rugged atmosphere. many people forget that san francisco before the 50s era was a tough irish catholic, italian catholic town, very traditional in
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 11:00pm EST
weekend edition of booktv, david talbot talks about san francisco in the 60s, 70s and 80s. being a >> roger williams, while he was a member of the clergy was also trained in civil law and the workforce or hook in the british parliament and the star chamber and we see a lot of these ideas in civil law and separation of church and state began to be articulated in text like this. as the famous bloody tenant of persecution. this is really where we see roger williams talking about the idea of the freedom of religion. he is very much showing at this point why he is different and why his thinking is different and why rhode island will be different for massachusetts, the plymouth bay colony and other colonies to the north. he was creating a land where people could come, worship as they chose to not always be protected by civil law. this did not of course if i was inclined orbit massachusetts. by active british parliament, all the copies of this book were set to be burned. luckily, not all of them were were able to show that to people today. >> in the book "season of the witch," author da
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:25am EST
: laurents is the owner of city lights bookstore in san francisco and what was it like back then? it. >> guest: a carnival of ids of place people would go to buy books or me inspired. the prize-winning american writer told me it was a great bookstore and a good place to pick up checks for entertainment and to have the peace demonstration a place where jerry garcia would meet there when the parents of a girlfriend had no idea what was going on. almost anything could happen >> host: how will you interested in his life? >> guest: i went to the bookstore in the bay area. later when i worked for the bookstore with the free university policies would encircle 1 degree orencircle 1 r for i corrupt buying books from him and it dawned on me there is a booktv written about the totality of his life. >> host: does is still exist? >> guest: when data is business in 2005 that the community would not allow it and put back into business after raising money. this year again the sun would put out of business and once again the community raised seven and a thousand dollars for the bookstore was sold to
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 2:00pm EST
. rusher always remained very proud of that. he retired in san francisco. he loved the climate. he loved the relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with this in '50s, and lived there for the last 20 years of his life, and i will leave you with this quote which also gives a sense of rusher0s attitude. in my last interview with him he said to me, san francisco has a dreadful reputation among conservatives, and new yorkers are always raising the subject with me. mostly new yorkers. he said i just dismiss it. i'm not the least bit interested in what the majority of people in san francisco think. i like the food. i like the weather. i like the am beens. at it where i want to live. and if they want to live there, too the liberals, good luck. >> i'll be eager for your questions. [applause] >> if you will, just raise your hand. we have a gentleman with the microphone, and if you will please give your name and then ask your question. hopefully not -- it's a question and not a statement. but all depends. please, first question. down here. thank you. >> you mentioned how ru
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:00pm EST
advice that they had time for him he always remained very proud at that. he retired to san francisco, she liked the climate and the relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with in the 50's and so he lived there about that last 20 years of his life. and i will leave you with this quote which also gives you a sense of his attitude. and perhaps my last interview with him he said to me san francisco has a dreadful reputation among the conservatives and the new yorkers are always raising the subject with me mostly new yorkers. he said i just dismiss it. i'm not the least bit interested in the majority of people in san francisco think. i like the food, i like the weather, i like the ambiance. it's where i want to live and if they want to live there, too, the liberals, good luck. i will be eager for your questions so long as we have time for it. [applause] >> if you will just raise your hand. we do have a gentleman with the microphone. and if you will please come give your name and then ask your question. hopefully a question and not a statement. yes, please come first qu
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 11:00am EST
great advice, had time for them. rusher always remained very proud of that. he retired to san francisco, loved the climate, relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with it in the 50s so he lived there the last 20 years of his life. i will leave you with this quote which gives a sense of rusher's attitude. perhaps my last interview with him, he said to me san francisco has a dreadful reputation among conservatives and new yorkers are always raising the subject with me, mostly new yorkers. i am not interested in what people in san francisco think. i like the food, the weather, the ambiance, it is where i want to live. if they want to live there too, the liberals, good luck. i will be eager for your questions as far as we have time. [applause] >> if you will just raise your hand, the gentleman with a microphone, please give your name and ask your question. hopefully a question, not a statement. first question down here. >> you mentioned how rusher wanted to take a populist tone. you think that -- >> speak up just a bit. >> a more populist tone to the conservative mo
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:45am EST
's on the west coast. so i know there's a few bookstores in san francisco. what you have here is very special. want to acknowledge a couple of groups but if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, groups to talk to first problem is see in your casket, the congress for urban is him. i'm sure you can find an online. but they are concerned about all the issues i'll be talking about tonight and there's a group that for 20 years now has been pushing these issues forward the strongest. i want to acknowledge the mayor who i'm so glad he is sure mayor. because i've been following him and working in direct with him for many years and seen the great things he's done to i'm sorry he couldn't be here tonight. but i'm sure there are different opinions in the room, democracy, but he's someone i admire tremendously. and i want to acknowledge the national threat institute. i'm on the advisory board. the national institute israel is in the world that pushes forward -- they invented, or we invented the return to the traditional neighborhood as alternative to suburban sprawl but they also greater
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30pm EST
, this is in san francisco, where one of my daughters lives. they closed and so she found another dim sum place in south san francisco, which name i can't remember, but it's on that main drive just before that. ornate city hall they have in south san francisco. i'll think of that name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i really enjoy your book, american story. i was always kind of curious about the process of researching the stories. i understandably basically that they were derived from newspaper headlines they think. >> they derived from my going to wherever it was in reporting the story. newspaper headlines -- buy direct to he means that's how i found out about them. >> i'm curious because i figured there must of been ideas that she pursued that did not turn into stories in the book and i'm wondering if there's any interesting stories that came out of that process. >> usually i went to a place because i had read something about it in a story or somebody found mia wrote me a letter. usually i ended up with that story, almost always good partly because i thought
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 2:00pm EST
to describe a particular pattern in san francisco. in which the welfare department has figured out that all of the senior welfare people should be on the second floor of the welfare office hiding from the people that they serve. the newest and least be people the people should be on the ground floor screening the others. and this describes the samoan community in san francisco. having figured out what the demos. and so you have 6-foot five and 6-foot six samoans tearing traditional workloads carrying traditional clubs. they would start to shift the fourth with their clubs. and so you have a normal sized person staring up at this samoan with his war club. anything, are they pay me enough for this? thomas wolfe was one of the greatest observers in our american generation. if you've never read this, you should. everything that wolfe described in his early essays. the left has continued to mutate and evolve and metastasize and become more broke than what wolfe first described it. so now instead of it being the local samoans at the local san francisco office, it is the national news media. they
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 7:00pm EST
. >> well, the restaurant we used to go to in millbrae for dim sum, this is in san francisco where one of my daughters lives. they closed and so she found another dim sum place in south san francisco, whose name i can't remember, but it's on the main drag just before that. ornate city hall they have in south san francisco. i'll think of the name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i really enjoy your book american stories that was always kind of curious about the process of researching the stories. i sort of understand only basically that they were derived from newspaper headlines i think. >> no, they were derived from my going to work for bias in reporting the story. newspaper headlines -- by dragging maybe that's how i found out about them. >> i was curious because there must've been 90 as he pursued in did not turn into stories in the book and i wondered if there is any interesting stories that came out of that process. >> usually i went to a place because i had read some thing about the story or somebody phone me or wrote me a letter. usually i ended up with
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
. now i have two kids and everything changed. it is that, got friends in san francisco who want to see me. another some good hucksters in san francisco. what you have here is very special. i want to acknowledge a couple groups if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, the group to talk to first base enu cascadia for new urbanism and i'm sure you can find them online, but they're concerned about the issues of the talking about tonight and descriptive for 20 years has in pushing these issues forward the strongest. i want to acknowledge the mayor who i'm so glad he is your mayor because i've been following him and working indirectly for many years and seeing great things he's done. i'm sorry you couldn't either tonight. but i'm sure there's different opinions in the room. it's a democracy, but he's someone someone i admire tremendously. i went to his knowledge the national charrette to do, but i'm actually under a storyboard. the only as a dude in a row forward -- they reinvented a return to the traditional neighborhood as an alternative, but they also created the planning
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 8:00pm EST
francisco. he love the climate. he loved the relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with it in the 50s and so he lived there for the last 20 years of his life. and i will leave you with this quote which also gives a sense of rusher attitude. in perhaps my last interview with him, he said to me, san francisco has a dreadful reputation among conservatives. and new yorkers are always raising the subject with me. mostly in new york. he said i just dismiss it. i'm not the least bit interested in what the majority of people in san francisco think. i like the food. i like the weather. i like the ambience. it's where i want to live in if they want to live there to, the liberals, good luck. i will be eager for your questions and so far as we have time for. [applause] >> if you will just raise your hand. we do have a microphone and if you'll please give your name and then ask your question. hopefully a basic question and not a statement. yes, please. down here. thank you. >> you mentioned how rusher wanted to take a more populist tone at some point. >> can you speak up just a
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
treatment? >> guest: oh, my goodness. i think i wax most poetically about the bay area, san francisco. i did--actually just came back from there and i must say, i just--aesthetically, it's one of the most pleasing places in the world because you've just got all these multiplicity of skin colors. i mean, just all these cultures stewed together and it just feels affluent and the weather is--in grand. but, you know, that being said, there's so many lovely places i did encounter. i mean, i fell in love with the desert. i fell in love with alaska. and there's certain charms in new england that you can't match. c-span: you say you learned that the alcan highway was built by blacks? >> guest: yes, this was after i had driven it and sort of had this sort of spiritual moment on kluane lake, which is this large glacial lake up in the yukon, and i got up there and i, you know, found out--and this was after having picked up all these souvenirs and--and books about the alcan highway, which folks don't know is about 1,900 miles long. c-span: where do you get it? where do you start--where do you start driv
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 7:00am EST
back to san francisco and he is tried on violating neutrality rules, he goes free because you can't find a jury to convict him, because a lot of americans still believe in manifest destiny. it's when walker gets to central america and becomes the president of nicaragua that he becomes a huge national figure. so there's a lot of people in america who really still have these very expansive views of what the the united states can become. it's not unusual for people to talk about the united states encompassing all of central america, canada, perhaps even south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you deal with that situation? well, it's not a coincidence that william walker basically supports slavery. so his idea of how to deal with racial issues is to bring african slaves into tease areas, you know, and some people are talking about how perhaps we should enslave central more thans themselves. so it's a very, it's a strange and unusual situation but, yeah, i think filibustering exists very uneasily with the u.s./mexico war. but by no means does the close of th
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 4:00pm EST
. there was all kinds of trouble at the u.n. organizing conference in san francisco. so her job was to administer the medication medications and keep him off the brandy. louise macey was a character. so they arrived in moscow. harry spent seven or eight days meeting with stalin to try to figure out why everything was falling apart. stalin had an opportunity to really lay out all of his grievances about the united states. among them being the united states abruptly cut off relief aid and surrender to russia. stalin was not at all happy about that. so the primary issue had to do with the organization and the polish government and who would be in the government. in the agreements were as loose as could possibly be. stalin was supposed to reorganize the government. and of of course, he of here this early, the only thing he cared about was protecting its borders. he didn't care about the u.n. he didn't care about reparations, and that was not his primary concern. his primary concern was territorial protections security forces country. so they went back and forth on that. the hopkins got nowhere on the
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2013 6:00am EST
, another san francisco hero, the organizer of the prosecutors union, coyote, she had some good friends and clients among the san francisco police force. one of the tips are off one night to the fact that charlie was going to be killed that night, bought a copy gives us the consumer and she warned him to get home as quickly as she could. as he could. so this was the kind of violent tensions that were bring within the city over reform, because what moscow and, of course, wanted to do was open up the police force to minority. it was a very white department in those days and they were fighting it tooth and nails. and the gays and women. and so we owe mayor moscone a great debt for standing his ground because of course he came out of that world and so. he was the son of catholic, had been a basketball star at saint ignatius, and he was seen as a traitor by many of the kids, the name he grew up with who later became part of the power structure in this town. [inaudible] >> well, i'm glad you brought that up there i want to say one thing. it's illustrative with that chapter i read about the co
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 7:30am EST
. -- haiti's history. david talbot presents a history of san francisco in the 1970s in "season of witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david von trailly looks at 1862, the second year of the civil war and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." watch for this book on booktv in the coming days. and in "full body burden," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located fear her childhood home in colorado. for an extended list of links to various publications' 2012 best books list, go to booktv.com. >> you've been watching booktv, 48 hours of book programming beginning saturday morning at 8 eastern through monday morning at 8 eastern. nonfiction books all weekend every weekend right here on c-span2. >> booktv is in prime time this weekend on c-span2. starting tonight at 8 eastern with david talbot on the history of san francisco from 1967 to 1982
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 11:00pm EST
and peggy noonan and michael daley but then jack london talking about the 1906 earthquake in san francisco and it has a sense of a perspective that we've visited a lot of this stuff before and great storytelling creates a perspective on our own problems. >> the destruction that is almost never talk about outside of texas puts to shame what's happened in new york with the hurricane. hundreds of thousands of people affected, destroyed and to read about it and see that there were people on the ground who knew about it and cared about it and were wondering at a time will anybody remember this and when the years have gone by it's really important for people to get the perspective. >> when we balance the scandals and the tragedies as well it's amazing when you read the perfect game the column where he calls him the cinderella man that is later made into a movie has never been before. we found it in the new york public library you get these great inspiring stories along with the stories and scandals and you know what the news cycle was right now in the sex scandal it really does show you we've be
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 2:00am EST
to of franklin d. roosevelt, acting secretary-general of united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently named president of the carnegie endowment for national peace. he emphatically denied chambers's allegation. a great deal more than the reputations of these two men was at stake. if this was innocent, anti communism, and those closely associated with the like richard nixon. it was dealt a devastating blow. if alger hiss was guilty, anti communism would occupy a prominent part of the political landscape, and his spokesman would become national leaders. furthermore, chambers and alger hiss each represented one side in the epic struggle of the cold war. one man symbolized the philosophy of freedom and western civilization. the other the ideology of totalitarianism and marxism and leninism. both left and right understood that america and the world was at a critical point in history. considered a major political events had transpired between august of 1948 when chambers confronted alger hiss at a congressional hearing. in may of 1952 when chambers published his managerial and m
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
to franklin d. roosevelt the acting secretary general from the founding conference it in san francisco and also named from the carnegie endowment for peace and a radically denied chambers allocation. a great deal more than the rest of station was at stake into communism and those associated with nixon a prominent member of the committee would be dealt a devastating blow. the guilty and communism occupy a part of the political landscape and furthermore chambers and hiss each represented one side. one represented freedom and western civilization and the other the etiology of totalitarianism. both the left and the right to understood america and the world was at a critical point* in history consider the major political events that transpired between august 1948 when chambers confronted hiss and may 1952 when chambers published "witness." 1948 the communists through a justice of akia coup d'etat the first seizure by force of a popular government and spending washington. at the shanghai shacked the following year the communist would assume command of the world's most populist nation. 1950 w
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 10:00pm EST
took office. molotov was causing all kinds of trouble with the u.n. organizing conference in san francisco and the polish underground people being arrested and so forth. so truman sent hot games to moscow. this is his last mission. he was quite sick. but he took his third wife with him and her job was to administer the medication and keep them off the brandy. she nicknamed the plane that they flew over to moscow the flying boudoir. that was luis macy. she was a dear. they arrived in moscow and harry spent seven or eight days ending with stalin, to try to figure out why everything was falling apart. stalin had an opportunity to really lay out all of his grievances about the united states. among them being the united states abruptly cut off the minute the german surrender to russia. and stalin was not at all happy about that. so the issue -- the primary issue has to do with the organization of the polish government and who would be in that government. the oslo agreements were a slapstick of those as they could possibly be. all they said was that stalin was supposed to reorganize th
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 5:00pm EST
practice in both san francisco and sacramento. i can attest to his prowess as an attorney because on one very interesting occasion he represented me. [laughter] on a speeding ticket. and got me off with a minimum fine. [laughter] from 1965 to 1988 justice kennedy was a professor of constitutional law at the mcgeorge school of law the university of the pacific located in sacramento. ander planted particularly of - the fact that he provided a valuable support to them governor ronald reagan on a number of legal issues as a volunteer lawyer. justice kennedy was appointed to the united states court of appeals for the ninth circuit in 1975 where he served for more than 12 years until president reagan nominated him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career as a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private pract
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 7:30am EST
've been in united states walking the streets, i had visited san francisco and, of course, washington. one of the things that i noticed is that america is a country that does not find itself in a state of depression as greece is. i've not seen any closed jobs. i haven't seen any sad faces. i haven't seen any signs of hopelessness everywhere. america avoided misery after 2008. you likely played a heavy burden -- paid a heavy burden upon the crisis in 2008. our economy continue to have difficulties recovering. your doctor was -- your jobless rate is still very high. people are still worked. millions of people are still having a very difficult time making a daily living. almost all the people continue being angry with all those who are responsible causing so much pain. that you avoided misery. in contrast, greece is going through a very deep misery. i'm not talking about a deep depression and i'm talking about misery. i want to make something clear. it's very clear to us that the greek economy and the greek state apparatus have their own endemic problems. these problems are structural and the
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 5:00pm EST
is steve lopez and peggy noonan, but then you read jack london about the 1906 earthquake in san francisco and it does create a sense of perspective. we been through a lot of this stuff before and it's great storytelling that creates perspective on our problems. the instruction of galveston outside of texas puts to shame i just have been in new york with hurricane stan knee. hundreds of thousands of people affect it, destroy to see there were people on the ground who knew about it, cared about it and were even wondering at the time, will anyone remember this? will people remember what happened to this town. it's important for people to get that data. thematically balanced tragedy to triumph as well. when you need surely povich on john larsen's perfect game, damon runyon's column where he calls cinderella man, later made into a movie. we found it in the new york public library, see her get these inspiring stories across with this scandal, tragedy and triumph. the new cycle right now involving a scandal really does show you we've been through this stuff before. every generation replaced ephe
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 11:00pm EST
at a summer camp and they do it every year as there was a bohemian club in san francisco at posted this confab corporate decision makers, government luminaries, diplomats, very important people. the equivalent today of some of the big events that have been announced then and when you see folks in short sleeves rubbing elbows with each other. so jackson actually was coming out in august of that year, 1952, to do that. so his professors at first he asked jackson, there is a groundbreaking at the law school. and then the professor surprised rehnquist a scene i'm going to arrange for you to meet him. the interesting thing is that rehnquist did meet him and met with jackson and jackson just kind of didn't even really interview him. he -- rehnquist had a swedish ancestry, which you type about a lot. it was a talking point of his always. so jackson got off on this tangent of talking about his swedish clients he had appeared and told rehnquist in stories that rehnquist really didn't get a chance to talk about himself very much. he didn't think he done a good job. he said it was nice to meet you and th
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 11:00pm EST
was probably still in the eighth grade but i remember being in san francisco when fit mondale was being nominated and at the san diego mcdonald's, 21 people were killed in a mass shooting. these have become kind of routine in this country to a greater degree than they are anywhere else in the western world. >> one thing to keep in mind -- the united states is not an unusually violent country. that an important point to keep in mind. when you look at the united states and care compare to the united kingdom, we do not have lots more assaults or robberies than places like the unite kingdom. the place where we're different is respect to our homicide rate. makes us very different and the difference between the united states and the united kingdom, almost all of it is driven by gun homicides. i am not very enthusiastic about letting my eight-year-old daughter watching violent video game, but i think the gun piece of this really is the most important thing that makes us so different from other industrialized countries. >> the point i would make with respect to that, is that there is a big diff
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 9:00am EST
tonight at 8 eastern with david talbot on the history of san francisco from 1967 to 1982. at 8:55 elizabeth dowling taylor on the life of white house slave paul jennings and his eventual freedom in 1847. at 9:50 chandra manning discusses the reasons why americans fought the civil war. and at 10:15, arthur herman on how fdr brought business leaders across the country to mobilize for world war ii. >> now, some of a washington post conference on women in leadership. we'll hear from andrea mitchell of nbc news, white house deputy chief of staff nancy-ann deparle, and the president of polytechnic institute. >> nancy-ann deparle, how are you? welcome. >> thanks. >> here we go. and dr. shirley ann jackson. and andrea mitchell. who's probably been working since fife this morning -- since five this morning too. >> how are you? >> i bet you every single person here has been up since five. >> i dressed based on what andrea had on. >> you saw her on tv, and then you said, oh -- that was clever. you're not a rhodes scholar for anything. [laughter] >> wow. >> 4:30 wakeup for morning joe. >>
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2013 11:00pm EST
that are the of opportunities because if not, we will not build a ticket. as in san francisco. i met someone there. i said to peter and his $72,000. how that can happen, if we know there's 9 million people waiting for treatment in africa, we need innovation. so i am seeing that what they knew that coming, which is very important. i know peter very well, he was my bios, my mentor, one of the best probably we have. and this also visited community to not show what it has been able to do for the world because today if we save millions of lives, i want to say that honestly we were no knower 10 years ago when looking for result country by country. why it's not working. today we have almost 7 million people. that is peter. peter moved us from million 2 billion in terms of resource privatization, demonstrating individual select to this indispensable to save lives for people and i want to say thanks to peter for that. >> thank you. that's nice, michel. but when you look at the index of this book, it's only people i met some purpose. why? because i was maybe different person, anything going wrong anywhere in the wo
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 8:00pm EST
. and of course, the assault pistol used in the san francisco shooting in which eight people were dead and of course, one of the more commonly seen firearms. it's time for us to do something. this is legislation that is needed, but it's not the only thing that's needed. we have to go beyond just an assault weapons ban. we have a responsibility to do something red we have been through this before. .. just wouldn't expect something like this to take place. if the slaughter of twenty babies was not capture your attention, then i give up. because i don't know what else will. -- that won't do anything. this is just the start, folks. look at this, and tell me why any of this needs to be on the streets of our city. if you can tell me that,ly listen to you. guess what? i don't think any of you can. because there's absolutely no reason they weren't meant to be in philadelphia, newtown, connecticut; aurora, colorado it's not what it's for. they weren't made for that. how are we going to go hunting with something like that that? we listen to the arguments and say it will prevent. i've been in the
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
in san francisco when fritz mondale was being nominated as a presidential candidate, and in san diego at the mcdonald's 21 people were killed in a mass shooting. these have become kind of routine in this country to a greater degree than they are anywhere else in the western world. >> i think one of the things that's really useful to keep in mind is that when you look at -- so the united states is not an unusually violent country. that is a really important point to keep in mind. when you look at the unite and you compare it to -- the united states and compare it to, say, the united kingdom, we do not have lots more assaults, lots more robberies than places like the united kingdom. is place where we're really different is with respect to our homicide rate. it's just the homicide rate that makes us different, and almost all the difference between the united states and united kingdom, almost all of it is driven by gun homicides. so i think, you know, i am not very enthusiastic about letting my 8-year-old daughter watching violent video games, but i think the gun piece of this really is,
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 8:00pm EST
a trail for -- and the united states senate, who teams with a former mayor of san francisco took office after the assassination of harvey and committed to stand against violence and for equality. from a maverick patriot i just talked about and former prisoner of war from arizona. from a song writer original compassionate conservative from utah. from a gravel voiced people champion from ohio, a soft spoken loyal honor winner from hawaii who use to the sit right here. from a college professor and senate who was taken from us far too soon and quickly. .. who helped expose their voter fraud of the marker's regime any dictatorship and giving a nation of more than 90 million people the opportunity to note democracy again. that's at the senate can do and that's what i love about it. instead of focusing on ideologies, jesse helme and i found our concern for the go drugs was greater than any political differences between us. and suggesting that it possible for an investigation to proceed in the senate to ask those linkages between the contras in nicaragua in american cities. that's at the senate
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2013 5:00pm EST
looks at is the fact that there's a difference is america between the matcher area and the san francisco bay area have high concentrations of people with college educations. they tend to be more productive than other regions. again when you are importing 2.2 million guys to work to drive down the waste of accountants that's great -- just getting. that rings lots of his most of the country intends to be pretty good and also because when you have a lot of cynicism on software made in india as opposed to the united states. part of that is because they are more productive than united states but with less skilled workers the complementarity thing is, the question is made of horn less skilled workers who speak english are not competing with emigrants who don't speak english. they are potentially complementary but the thing is we actually have a decent sized stock of people in the country right now who are less skilled web limited english language proficiency. the one 11 joke i hear is those are obviously not the people you care about republican restrictionists because they look different and t
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2013 2:00am EST
. [applause] >> thank you so much and thank you for braving the san francisco juggernaut to be here tonight. and thank you for the booksmith for having me. i love to hang out at the store. i'm a customer more than i am an author and hopefully i have help keep your business over the years. but it's appropriate actually this weather because it's buried daschle hammond likened the season in which people knew for the hippie or stereotypes about to be, but i really wanted with "season of the witch" to tell the history of the city as daschle hammond might have written it, with the same sense of the city's toughness, of its mystery and of its kind of rugged atmosphere. many people forget that san francisco before the 50s era was a tough irish catholic, italian catholic town, very traditional in many ways and the first wave of hippies who came to this city really have the drawbridge pulled up on them. many of the kids couldn't get treatment when they had drug drop bombs and other medical problems. they were given the cold shoulder by the city and city officials. the cops were after them. so that wa
CSPAN
Jan 4, 2013 2:00am EST
a ticket. as in san francisco. i met someone there. i said to peter and his $72,000. how that can happen, if we know there's 9 million people waiting for treatment in africa, we need innovation. so i am seeing that what they knew that coming, which is very important. i know peter very well, he was my bios, my mentor, one of the best probably we have. and this also visited community to not show what it has been able to do for the world because today if we save millions of lives, i want to say that honestly we were no knower 10 years ago when looking for result country by country. why it's not working. today we have almost 7 million people. that is peter. peter moved us from million 2 billion in terms of resource privatization, demonstrating individual select to this indispensable to save lives for people and i want to say thanks to peter for that. >> thank you. that's nice, michel. but when you look at the index of this book, it's only people i met some purpose. why? because i was maybe different person, anything going wrong anywhere in the world in terms of aids was my personal problem.
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